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7 Travel Books for You to Feed Your Wanderlust!

This year is about to end. The mountains, the forests, and the deep blue oceans are calling you through a chilling breeze. It says, “Are you coming?” Can you hear it? Then, it is time to pack your bag and be ready to travel the unknown.

Oh, you cannot go because you have a lot of assignments to do. Okay, do not be sad. Instead, give your academic worries to professional writing assistance services for several topics, such as geography assignment help services, because I have something in mind for you.

A bag full of surprises can take you to places you may have seen in your dreams or on your laptop’s monitor, that too without a ticket!

Yes, I am talking about travel books that will make you feel like – “Gonna travel, gonna travel wild and free.

Hire trustworthy academic writing services like geography assignment help online services to take care of your assignments, and you dive into the unimaginable creations of your species!

7 Books That Can Make You Wanderer

Reading and travelling are like two best friends. They both can take you to the mountains of the dragons or the forests of Aragog if you want. But unfortunately, when you cannot hold the hands of travelling, make the reading your friend, philosopher, and guide.

Being a busy soul of this universe, I am often compelled to choose travel books as my companion while exploring the world.

It is because I believe –

“The woods are lovely dark and deep,

But I have promises to keep,

And miles to go before I sleep

And miles to go before I sleep.” – Robert Frost

So, today this blog is a toast to all those souls who can travel through imagination. Here’s pandora’s box for you. Open it and lose yourself in the unknown and feed your wanderlust.

“The Adventure of Tintin” by Herge

What could be more motivating for a youthful traveller (or an older nomad who is still young in heart) than the action-packed travels of a reporter and his tiny dog? I have no hesitation in giving credit to the visually stimulating Tintin comic novels for inspiring my wanderlust as a child and still influencing me to travel now.

Before I was ten, the Belgian cartoonist Hergé’s “The Adventures of Tintin” comic book series brought me to Egypt, the Congo, Tibet, and even the moon. I heartily suggest the series to people of all ages because they provided me with such wonderful memories.

“The Beach” by Alex Garland

Who among us has not daydreamed about that fictitious island with its turquoise waves and golden sunlight? But fantasies never live up to aspirations, as “The Beach” poignantly illustrates. The definition of paradise has been altered by this book. First, Garland paints a vision of paradise, fooling the audience into believing that the protagonists have genuinely discovered paradise on earth. Then he starts hammering home reality with betrayal, terrible secrets, and murder. There is no such thing as heaven, I learned from the book. Finding this utopia is not worthwhile. Instead, it is much more rewarding to discover the beauty that may be found in the locals’ realities of everyday living.

“On the Road” by Jack Kerouac

The timeless trip story by Jack Kerouac, a member of the Beat Generation, was written in 1957. Sal, the protagonist of the story, is shown leaving New York City and travelling west on trains while making new friends and having a good time. Many of us may relate to the main character’s frustration and desire to travel the world. What I particularly like about On the Road is how, through all his travel experiences, he develops into a better, stronger, and more self-assured person, which I can relate to personally.

“Into the Wild” by Jon Krakauer

One of the best novels on travel adventures is Into the Wild, which recounts the real-life tale of a young graduate named Christopher McCandless who gave all his money to charity before packing his bag and taking a vacation. The narrative follows a man as he travels from Alaska across the west coast of America in pursuit of his aspirations. A party of Alaskan moose hunters discovered McCandless’ remains in the dense wilderness after four months.

The book explores a person’s preoccupation with avoiding society, withdrawing from the outside world, testing his personal boundaries, getting near nature, and seeking enlightenment through solitude. Alexander Supertramp was another name McCandless used.

“The Alchemist” by Paulo Coelho

Whether it is incredible archaeological sites or the tastiest dinner, most adventurers are looking for something. However, while you are focused on looking outside of yourself, you frequently find a part of yourself that you were unaware of. In “The Alchemist” by Paulo Coelho, exactly that occurs.

In the captivating tale “The Alchemist,” a shepherd from Andalusia sets out in search of treasure. But instead, he discovers himself while on his excursions.

With his enchanting tales of snakes, love, dunes, and alchemy, Coelho takes us on the journey that really matters—a voyage filled with lessons.

“Life of Pi” by Yann Martel

Life of Pi is an intriguing fantasy adventure book that tells the tale of Piscine Molitor Patel, a young Pondicherry kid whose father works as a zookeeper. The narrative gradually reveals how he lost his family in a shipwreck and spent months in the Pacific Ocean in a lifeboat with Richard Parker, a massive Bengal Tiger.

Through the eyes of this youngster, who grows from a child to a young man, the book attempts to analyse spirituality, religion, and the psychological impact of this traumatic experience. While on vacation, you must read this young boy’s story of survival. The same-named movie was likewise based on this book.

“A Walk in the Woods” by Bill Bryson

The story of Bill Bryson’s vain effort to hike the Appalachian Trail is told in this amusing autobiography. The Appalachian Trail, which runs 2,200 miles from Maine to Georgia, passes through some of America’s most beautiful landscapes, including dazzling lakes, stunning mountains, and imposing forests. Bryson introduces us to some of the path’s ecology, sociology, and history in one of the best travel novels for nature enthusiasts. He also introduces us to some oddball people he encounters along the way.

Final Thoughts,

Any excellent travel book’s success can be gauged not by accolades but by mileage. These books are significant because of the research paper help they transport us to in our imaginations and the miles they motivate us to climb, drive and fly. And occasionally, reading a travel book can be just as transforming as the actual voyage.

So, go to the part of the world that you want to see with these books. Till then, bon adieu, my friends!

Williumson

Kate Johnson is a content writer, who has worked for various websites. She is also a college graduate who has a B.A in Journalism.

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